We aim for pain relief and better function without surgery

Broadly speaking, arthritis can be divided into inflammatory (diseases such as Rheumatoid) arthritis or more commonly degenerative or osteoarthritis. In osteoarthritis (OA) there is a breakdown of normal joint fluid and cartilage, sometimes due to an injury such as an ACL tear or fracture, but more commonly due to a combination of aging processes, genetics, and lifestyle factors. While OA can affect any joint, the knee and hip are often the most problematic as this typically limits activity and quality of life.

  • OA is a major cause of disability and chronic pain in Australia
  • >3.95 million Australians suffer from OA pain
  • Up to two thirds of people suffering from OA are of working age
  • Traditionally, treatments are only directed towards pain relief
  • While pain relief remains a primary objective at SPARC, we believe in a multidisciplinary approach to reduce progression of OA, increase function and quality of life and health

While having some degree of OA is a normal part of aging, there are many strategies other than surgery that can help keep you healthy and active in your life.

Ongoing knee or hip pain should not be dismissed as an inevitable part of getting older, especially if it starts to limit your daily life and activity levels

Rest would seem to be a common-sense approach to take if a joint hurts, however studies and international consensus are unanimous that activity plays a major part of appropriate treatment.  We have a fully equipped specialty OA gym service, with appropriate sports physiotherapists and exercise physiologists to help guide you through the process, whether it be with 1:1 sessions or small group classes.

Treatment options

In addition, there are many other evidence based strategies to explore which can include:

  • Weight loss (shown to reduce 4x that amount of force on the knee joint)
    • So even losing 5kg would feel like taking 20kg of pressure off the joint
  • Bracing and orthotics to deload the more symptomatic side
  • A variety of natural supplements and gels
  • Modern pharmaceuticals
  • Radiofrequency denervation (numb the nerves in the joint)
  • Injection therapies        
    • Corticosteroids
    • Visco-supplementation gels (stimulating an increase in normal joint lubrication)
    • Platelet rich plasma (blood injections)
  • In addition, we are the only specialist physician practice in South Australia soon to engage in research and use of stem cell treatments for cartilage defects and OA.  

Exercise is Medicine

However underpinning all treatments for osteoarthritis is movement. SPARC practitioners believe that “exercise is medicine” remains a key component of treatment. Surgical options are of course advised in many advanced situations, but for those whom surgery is either not appropriate, or arthritis not yet bad enough to warrant surgery, our aim is to defer your joint replacement as long as possible while keeping you moving and comfortable in your life.

If non-surgical management of your OA is your aim, we look forward to working with you to keep you moving, healthy and happy.

Latest updates

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Facebook — October 18, 2017

The Sports and Arthritis Clinic (SPARC) in conjunction with My Physio SA welcome you to join the Introduction to Strength Training for Female Runners Program. Strength training plays an important role in training for female runners, as it can improve performance and reduce the risk of developing an injury.What is it? The group program is run by our Exercise Physiologist with input from a sports physiotherapist and podiatrist. The program is 8 weeks in duration, broken down into the introduction phase, strength endurance phase and running specific training phase. The aims of the program are to teach you the practical skills and techniques of strength training and provide information on the following topics: • What is strength? • Why strength training is important for a female runner • How to fit strength training into your running plan • How to maintain a strength training planTime The program will run in the SPRAC gym on Thursday evenings at 6:15 pm to 7: 00 pm, commencing Thursday 26th of October and finishing Thursday the 14th of December.Cost The cost is $280.00 for the 8 weeks. If you have private health insurance you be eligible for a rebate under Exercise Physiology and a receipt will be provided at the end of the program to claim, contact your health care provider for details. Contact DetailsPh: (08) 8234 9707 Email: reception@sportclinic.com.au Website: www.sportsandarthritisclinic.com.au

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Facebook — October 18, 2017

The Sports and Arthritis Clinic (SPARC) in conjunction with My Physio SA welcome you to join the Introduction to Strength Training for Female Runners Program. Strength training plays an important role in training for female runners, as it can improve performance and reduce the risk of developing an injury.What is it? The group program is run by our Exercise Physiologist with input from a sports physiotherapist and podiatrist. The program is 8 weeks in duration, broken down into the introduction phase, strength endurance phase and running specific training phase. The aims of the program are to teach you the practical skills and techniques of strength training and provide information on the following topics: • What is strength? • Why strength training is important for a female runner • How to fit strength training into your running plan • How to maintain a strength training planTime The program will run in the SPRAC gym on Thursday evenings at 6:15 pm to 7: 00 pm, commencing Thursday 26th of October and finishing Thursday the 14th of December.Cost The cost is $280.00 for the 8 weeks. If you have private health insurance you be eligible for a rebate under Exercise Physiology and a receipt will be provided at the end of the program to claim, contact your health care provider for details. Contact DetailsPh: (08) 8234 9707 Email: reception@sportclinic.com.au Website: www.sportsandarthritisclinic.com.au

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Facebook — October 17, 2017

What is a Sports & Exercise Physician?They are doctors with specialist training in the management of musculoskeletal injuries and illnesses to maximize function and minimize disability and time away from your sport, work, or school. After graduating from medical school, a minimum of a further 7 years is required along with various examination and research requirements to gain an ACSEP fellowship.Did you know SPARC has 2 out of 4 Sports & Exercise Physicians currently working in South Australia?Find out more about Dr Geoffrey Verrall and Dr Duncan Walker on our website!#SportsPhysician #Adelaide #SouthAustralia #ExercisePhysician #Specialist #MuscularSkeletal #Sports #ExerciseIsMedicinehttps://www.sparc.com.au/how-we-can-help/sports-physicians

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Instagram — October 16, 2017

CONGRATULATIONS Dr Duncan Walker for passing his final Sports & Exercise Physician exam on the weekend! This means that Dr Walker has gone through med school to be a GP and then went on further to complete his 7 years of Sports and Exercise Physicians training and is ONE of FOUR in South Australia!Keep and eye out for our next post which explains what a Sports & Exercise Physician is (the difference between them and a Sports Doctor and a Surgeon) and what they can do you help you! #SportsPhysician #Adelaide #SouthAustralia #ExercisePhysician #Specialist #MuscularSkeletal #CleverCookie #HardYards

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